Master Planning: Town Within a Park, Within a City: Jamshedpur 2057: Town Within a Park, Within a City

In our analysis we looked at several sources including the Census of India, the JNNURM report for the area and the 2012 Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration 2027 plan, among others. In essence the population projections from the 2007 JNNURM report imply that by 2057 (the 150th year anniversary of Jamshedpur) the population for the Jamshedpur Command Area (JCA) would be approximately 3.5 Million people. These numbers are startling when you take into consideration that this would mean the current population (2014) of Jamshedpur (estimated at 629,938) would quintuple in the next four decades. We also computed a population projection based on a 2.7% annual growth rate (the uniform rate of growth of population in the JCA has been 2.7% per annum for the last two decades) forecasting that by 2057 Jamshedpur would grow to approximately 2,034,217 Million people. This would mean the current population of Jamshedpur would triple in the next four decades.By either measure, Jamshedpur must strategically plan the future development and welfare of the town or risk the continued adverse effects of unplanned population growth that has begun to plague the city in the past two decades.  Planning principles, at a basic level, must address current issues such as how to manage overcrowding, inadequate housing, workers discontent, poor sanitation and other social, infrastructural and ecological ills.We must plan to conserve and cultivate the resources of the earth and the resources of our own nature. Our aim is to increase the richness of life and enhance its quality. We want more varied and fuller achievement in human society, less monotony and predictability. We want more enjoyment and less suffering. We want more beauty and less ugliness. We want more adventure and disciplined freedom, as against routine and slavishness. We want more knowledge, more interest, more wonder, as against ignorance & apathy. The further point I want to make is that population overgrowth is beginning to ruin our own spiritual and mental habitat. Not content with destroying or squandering our resource of material things, we are beginning to destroy the resources of true enjoyment – spiritual, aesthetic, intellectual, emotional resources. We are spreading great masses of human habitation over the face of the land, neither in planned cities or villages, just a vast mass of informal settlement upon land that was once designated for agricultural uses. (© Jessica Jamroz)
Jamshedpur 2057: Town Within a Park, Within a City

In our analysis we looked at several sources including the Census of India, the JNNURM report for the area and the 2012 Jamshedpur Urban Agglomeration 2027 plan, among others. In essence the population projections from the 2007 JNNURM report imply that by 2057 (the 150th year anniversary of Jamshedpur) the population for the Jamshedpur Command Area (JCA) would be approximately 3.5 Million people. These numbers are startling when you take into consideration that this would mean the current population (2014) of Jamshedpur (estimated at 629,938) would quintuple in the next four decades.  

We also computed a population projection based on a 2.7% annual growth rate (the uniform rate of growth of population in the JCA has been 2.7% per annum for the last two decades) forecasting that by 2057 Jamshedpur would grow to approximately 2,034,217 Million people. This would mean the current population of Jamshedpur would triple in the next four decades. 

By either measure, Jamshedpur must strategically plan the future development and welfare of the town or risk the continued adverse effects of unplanned population growth that has begun to plague the city in the past two decades. Planning principles, at a basic level, must address current issues such as how to manage overcrowding, inadequate housing, workers discontent, poor sanitation and other social, infrastructural and ecological ills. 

We must plan to conserve and cultivate the resources of the earth and the resources of our own nature. Our aim is to increase the richness of life and enhance its quality. We want more varied and fuller achievement in human society, less monotony and predictability. We want more enjoyment and less suffering. We want more beauty and less ugliness. We want more adventure and disciplined freedom, as against routine and slavishness. We want more knowledge, more interest, more wonder, as against ignorance & apathy.  

The further point I want to make is that population overgrowth is beginning to ruin our own spiritual and mental habitat. Not content with destroying or squandering our resource of material things, we are beginning to destroy the resources of true enjoyment – spiritual, aesthetic, intellectual, emotional resources. We are spreading great masses of human habitation over the face of the land, neither in planned cities or villages, just a vast mass of informal settlement upon land that was once designated for agricultural uses. (© Jessica Jamroz)